A Gregarious Jumper?

This time last year in Greg’s sneaky guest post he announced that he was finally ready to have a jumper for knit for him. I was really excited about this! Of course I’d had lots of success with hats that have been worn to death, socks that are well worn, driving mitts and a cowl made from handspun. But a jumper is a different level of commitment altogether, though we were well beyond the reaches of the ‘sweater curse’. We’d talked about it numerous times but he was never quite ready to take that step. Once the decision was made it only remained to find the perfect pattern and the perfect yarn.

I spent months trawling through knit books, ravelry and other online pattern resources. Checking out patterns, looking at all the various modifications that people had made, suggesting several options to himself. One problem we came up against was that he couldn’t quite visualise the pattern separate from the yarn, the colour and the pictured size. Which made it tricky to figure out which patterns he might have liked in a different yarn. Another sticking point was trying to figure out what he likes in a jumper, in terms of fit, style, neck, length etc. It turns out he likes mostly plain jumpers, in fact usually he lives in zippy fleeces. Not too tricky to knit but incredibly boring and would probably make more sense to purchase. Especially as he typically likes dark plain colours like black, dark drown and dark grey.

However he strangely decided on seeing some bright green, orange and blue yarn, which I received as a birthday present, that this was the yarn for his jumper. I must admit I was very hesitant to knit him a jumper from it. I really didn’t think he would wear it – so brightly coloured and variegated too! Also it’s half wool so it could be quite rough and itchy. I swatched several times, showed him several garments made with similar yarn, and repeatedly asked him if he was *sure* he would actually like and wear a jumper like that. Eventually he seemed adamant that he would and so began the pattern process again.

With such variegated bright wool only a plain pattern would suit, which was fine. I decided it needed to be knit top down so that he could try it on and let me know early if he changed his mind. It also would keep the striping nicely around the yoke. I went with a mash-up of four different raglan sweater recipes. There was a spreadsheet involved, tracking his measurements, measurements of his favourite jumpers, how many stitches these would be at the different gauges I had swatched. After a few weeks work I had a custom fit pattern ready to trial. I cast on and knit! There were a few bumps along the way as I watched nervously to see if he liked it. The bottom of the jumper had to be reknit several times to get it to the right length. First too long, then too short, and then just a smidge too short but I couldn’t face ripping all the ribbing and the i-cord bind off AGAIN, so it stayed that way. I didn’t add any ribbing at the neck, leaving it with an open neck and just an i-cord trim, to avoid any itching.

He seems pretty happy with how it turned out :) It’s made from a lofty bulky-weight wool and acrylic blend, knit at a loose gauge so it’s very warm but light and breathable. Exactly what he needs for early mornings on call and cold evenings in Donegal.He hasn’t been brave enough to wear it outside the house yet but I know it’s keeping him warm when he needs it. I optimistically named the project ‘Greg’s first jumper’ on ravelry. Maybe next time I can make a jumper he’ll wear in public and not just because he’s freezing cold :P

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